STUDY IN IRELAND

About Ireland:

A Safe and friendly English speaking Country with Internationally Ranked Universities and Institutions and has a Modern Knowledge Economy focused on services and High Tech Industry.

Ireland, in Irish "Éire", is a popular destination among students from other states of European Union as well as from other regions of the world. In fact, in 2009 more than 8% of the student population body was formed by international students.

Whether you plan to study in Ireland as an exchange student, as a regular student or simply participate in short-term summer courses in Ireland, you will not only enjoy the friendliness and hospitality of the Irish people, but also the international atmosphere and the high quality of Ireland's higher education institutions and research institutes.

Why Ireland?

• Wide and extensive range of courses
• 1 Year Post Study Work Visa available on completion of degree
• Easy Conversion of Post Study Work Visa into Green Card/ Work Permit
• Multiple Scholarships of 50% to 100% available on merit basis
• Affordable living costs with the option to work part time while studying

University System

The strength of Ireland's higher education is a big draw and a variety of academic paths are open to international students.

As well as the arts and literature, Irish universities offer programes in technology and communications, history, environmental science, and peace and conflict studies.

Higher education in Ireland is provided mainly by seven universities, 14 institutes of technology, including the Dublin Institute of Technology and seven colleges of education. There is also a number of other tertiary institutions providing specialist education in fields such as art and design, medicine, business studies, rural development, theology, music and law.

Applications for entry to undergraduate courses in universities, colleges of education, institutes of technology and some other institutes of higher education, are centrally processed by the Central Applications Office (CAO).

Universities retain the function of making decisions on admissions, using a points system based on the Leaving Certificate. Points can also be scored for results in other examinations, such as UK A-levels. The current CAO point allocation for A-levels is: A* (150), A (135), B (120), C (100), D (75) and E (40).
Each university has a minimum entry requirement, usually requiring a pass grade in either English or Irish, as well as maths. Some also require a pass grade in a modern continental European language (French, German, Spanish or Italian).
The closing date for normal applications is in February of the year of entry. Late applications must be received by a date in May.

Tution Fess

Most UK students will effectively pay no tuition fees. The Irish government picks up the bill for students who are EU/EEA nationals, or have been granted official refugee status, or have been resident in an EU member state for at least three of the five years preceding entry to the course.

However, all students are required to pay a student contribution on entry to their courses, covering costs such as equipment usage, administration fees and exam fees. This replaced the discredited registration fee in 2011 after a series of large annual increases. For 2012–13, the contribution was €2,250 (£1,900), set to rise to €3,000 by 2015.
For the admission year 2012–1) Education in Ireland advised those undergraduates who did not qualify to expect to pay €31,000–€45,000 for medicine and related subjects, €9,100–€20,300 for engineering, €9,100–€16,500 for science and technology, and €9,100–€15,500 for business and arts and humanities.
Student grants may be available to EU/EEA residents through the centralised Student Grant Scheme, administered by Student Finance. Scholarships are offered by the government, individual universities, and independent organisations.

Accommodation

Accommodation ranges from on-campus residencies to student hostels and private rented accommodation. On campus accommodation can be scarce

Costs of living

Ireland, in common with much of the EU, is not a cheap country in which to live.
Recent estimates for the cost of a year in Dublin have ranged between €8,000 and €12,100, largely depending on the type of accommodation chosen, including rent, electricity, food, books and laundry and medicine as well as travel passes and social expenses, but excluding tuition fees.

Working while studying

All nationals from the EEA are free to take up employment in Ireland while studying.
Students from outside the EEA on recognised courses can to take up casual employment (up to 20 hours part-time work per week or full-time work during normal college vacation periods). All other work is prohibited.

Health and safety

Under EU/EEA regulations students from other member states who are attending a course of study are entitled to medical services in Ireland.
In order to be eligible for any of these services, you will be required to provide the Irish health authorities with documentation from your home country that validates your entitlement.
All non-EEA students are required to have private medical insurance when coming to and residing in Ireland for the purpose of stud


Location:


Contact Info:

Call US @

+91 9943432678

#135, 5th Street (Opp Kalyan Silks)

Gandhipuram,

Coimbatore – 641012

e-mail: info@doeindia.com